Waves in lakes make waves in the Earth

Scientists at the University of Utah report that small seismic signals emanating from lakes can aid science. As a record of wave motion in a lake, they can reveal when a lake freezes over and when it thaws. And as a small, constant source of seismic energy in the surrounding earth, lake microseisms can shine a light on the geology surrounding a lake.

A celestial celebration of Earth’s place in the Cosmos, mapped onto Earth

It’s been repeated now a million times, but its grandeur bears another announcement: on August 21, 2017, a long-awaited total solar eclipse will cast the moon’s narrow shadow directly across the United States. The reverse perspective–the vantage that humans have always had, although they haven’t necessarily understood it–is that the sun will be gradually but briefly blocked by the invisible day-time visage of the new moon. Although the eclipse will …

New study details earthquake, flood risk for Eastern European, Central Asian countries

By Madeleine Jepsen How will future disasters affect countries in Eastern Europe and Central Asia? Researchers aiming to answer this question used projected changes in population and Gross Domestic Product (GDP) for 33 countries, along with climate, flood and earthquake risk models, to estimate how each country is affected by flooding and earthquakes now and in the future. In addition, the earthquake model was used to estimate fatalities and capital …

70-year record shows long-term trend in atmospheric river activity along U.S. West Coast

By Madeleine Jepsen A new study has identified the climate variation patterns which exert the most influence on atmospheric river activity along the West Coast. One of these patterns is the long-term increasing trend associated with Pacific Ocean warming likely due to human activity.  The new study compiled an unprecedented seven-decade-long record of atmospheric river activity along the West Coast to explore variations in the climate and long-term trends in water …

New emission-reducing stoves not much better for environment than old stoves, study finds

By Madeleine Jepsen Cookstoves meant to curb carbon emissions and reduce pollutants may not be as climate-friendly as previously thought, a new study finds. Traditional bio-fueled cookstoves, used by one-third of the global population, burn wood and other organic material to cook food. A new study measuring the types of carbon in fine particulate matter emitted from these types of cookstoves in India found newer stoves designed to reduce emissions …

Innovation mitigates cloud problem in global climate and weather forecast models

CIRES scientist’s new framework promises to improve cloud representation, forecast accuracy Anyone with a cell phone camera and kids or dogs knows that resolution is “expensive”: taking lots of very high-resolution photographs and video clips can quickly fill a device. An analogous resolution challenge in weather and climate modeling has dogged modelers for years: Computationally, it’s just too expensive to represent certain clouds in the detail needed to make them …