New emission-reducing stoves not much better for environment than old stoves, study finds

By Madeleine Jepsen Cookstoves meant to curb carbon emissions and reduce pollutants may not be as climate-friendly as previously thought, a new study finds. Traditional bio-fueled cookstoves, used by one-third of the global population, burn wood and other organic material to cook food. A new study measuring the types of carbon in fine particulate matter emitted from these types of cookstoves in India found newer stoves designed to reduce emissions …

Innovation mitigates cloud problem in global climate and weather forecast models

CIRES scientist’s new framework promises to improve cloud representation, forecast accuracy Anyone with a cell phone camera and kids or dogs knows that resolution is “expensive”: taking lots of very high-resolution photographs and video clips can quickly fill a device. An analogous resolution challenge in weather and climate modeling has dogged modelers for years: Computationally, it’s just too expensive to represent certain clouds in the detail needed to make them …

Researchers uncover 200-year-old sunspot drawings in Maine

In April of 1815, the volcanic eruption of Mount Tambora in Indonesia caused a global decrease in temperatures for the following few years, and 1816 came to be known as the “year without a summer.” New England states were particularly hard hit by these temperature changes, which significantly affected agriculture production and quality of life. Alongside his journal entries, Reverend Jonathan Fisher of Blue Hill, Maine sketched the sunspots during the summer of 1816, thinking they might be responsible for the cold summer temperatures.