Mkango Releases Financial Statements And Management’s Discussion And Analysis For The Period Ending June 30, 2016

Calgary, Alberta: August 31, 2016 – Mkango Resources Ltd. (TSXV: MKA; AIM: MKA) (the \’Company\’ or \’Mkango\’), is pleased to announce that it has released the Financial Statements and Management’s Discussion and Analysis for the period ending June 30,2016. The reports are now available on the Company’s website via the following link: http://www.mkango.ca/s/financials.asp, and will also be made

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Magma chamber processes in Early Cretaceous Shangzhuang layered mafic intrusion from the North China Craton

The Fe–Ti ore‐bearing Shangzhuang mafic intrusion in the Yanshan Orogenic Belt, north of the North China Craton, is characterized by compositional layering with troctolite, noritic gabbro and gabbro from the bottom to the top. The intrusive complex formed through fractionation of Fe‐, Ti‐ and Mg‐rich mafic hydrous magma. Here, we present a systematic petrological and mineral data on the various rock types from this intrusion. The plagioclase laths exhibit Na‐enriched rims with homogeneous cores and XAn content decreasing towards the margin, induced by sluggish coupled inter‐diffusion of (Ca + Al) versus (Na + Si). The reactions also resulted in amphibole and orthopyroxene rims surrounding olivine. Subsolidus equilibrium is indicated by Fe–Ti oxide lamellae in pyroxenes. The H2O content of the primary magma is estimated to be less than 2.5 wt.%, and initial crystallization temperature in the magma chamber is estimated as approximately 884 °C at a pressure of 3.45 kbar. The formation of the parent magma was due to the thermal–chemical erosion through mantle upwelling, basaltic underplating and heat input from convection of deep asthenosphere mantle, widely associated with the large‐scale Mesozoic lithospheric thinning beneath the North China Craton. Final emplacement of the Shangzhuang intrusion is related to the intra‐continental extensional setting, at a depth of approximately 14.5 km, suggesting large‐scale, post‐emplacement uplift and exhumation of the Yanshan Orogenic Belt in the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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Form, evolution and controls of a Jurassic incised valley‐fill: middle part of the Western Sichuan Depression, China

The second member of the Middle Jurassic Shaximiao Formation in the rejuvenated Western Sichuan Foreland Basin contains tens of metres of thick incised valley successions. Incised valleys have been widely discussed in traditional models; however, quantitative and detailed analyses of geometric variations and their interpreted controls on ancient incised valleys have rarely been attempted in the past. Using an integrated dataset of seismic profiles, well logs and cores, this study quantifies the geometric parameters of incised valleys and investigates the smaller‐scale depositional patterns. (1) During this period, incised valleys (IV) were 5–17 km wide, 20–60 m deep and traceable for 120 km along their axis, placing these valleys among the longest seismically imaged incised valleys in the world. (2) Three nested incised valley successions IV‐1, IV‐2 and IV‐3 can be identified. Except for IV‐2, the incised valleys decrease in width and depth downstream. (3) In the downstream segment, the role of tectonism diminishes gradually, and periodic base‐level changes control the form and evolution of the incised valleys. A downstream decrease in the stream power appears to be responsible for the decreasing trend in the incised valley geometry. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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Form, evolution and controls of a Jurassic incised valley-fill: middle part of the Western Sichuan Depression, China

The second member of the Middle Jurassic Shaximiao Formation in the rejuvenated Western Sichuan Foreland Basin contains tens of metres of thick incised valley successions. Incised valleys have been widely discussed in traditional models; however, quantitative and detailed analyses of geometric variations and their interpreted controls on ancient incised valleys have rarely been attempted in the past. Using an integrated dataset of seismic profiles, well logs and cores, this study quantifies the geometric parameters of incised valleys and investigates the smaller-scale depositional patterns. (1) During this period, incised valleys (IV) were 5–17 km wide, 20–60 m deep and traceable for 120 km along their axis, placing these valleys among the longest seismically imaged incised valleys in the world. (2) Three nested incised valley successions IV-1, IV-2 and IV-3 can be identified. Except for IV-2, the incised valleys decrease in width and depth downstream. (3) In the downstream segment, the role of tectonism diminishes gradually, and periodic base-level changes control the form and evolution of the incised valleys. A downstream decrease in the stream power appears to be responsible for the decreasing trend in the incised valley geometry. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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U–Pb zircon age, geochemical and isotopic characteristics of the Miaoya syenite and carbonatite complex, central China

The Miaoya syenite and carbonatite complex is located in the southern margin of the South Qinling belt, central China. LA‐ICP‐MS zircon U–Pb dating reveals that the syenite and carbonatite have crystallization ages of 445.2 ± 2.6 Ma (MSWD = 0.66) and 434.3 ± 3.2 Ma (MSWD = 1.08), respectively. Both syenite and carbonatite display low ISr values (0.7004 to 0.7053) and depleted εNd(t) values of +1.1 to +5.5, with one‐stage Nd model ages of 0.65 to 0.94 Ga. Their zircon εHf(t) values are also similarly positive (+3.1 to +8.9), and one‐stage Hf model ages range from 0.71 to 0.92 Ga. Whole‐rock geochemistry suggests that the syenite belongs to the shoshonitic series and both syenite and carbonatite show identical REE and trace element patterns. The coeval intrusive ages, similar geochemical and Sr–Nd–Hf isotopic compositions suggest that the Miaoya carbonatite and associated syenite are genetically related to each other. We consider that the carbonatite could be a final product by protracted fractionation of a CO2‐rich alkaline melt. The depleted εNd(t) and zircon εHf(t) isotopes also indicate that the associated syenite and carbonatite could be originated from a mantle‐derived magma. The sources are likely composed of dominated HIMU mantle and minor EMI mantle. We propose that the Silurian Miaoya Complex was formed in the extensional rifting setting, associated with the mantle upwelling. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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Geochronology, geochemistry and tectonic implications of Weitingchagan composite pluton in northern segment of the Xing‐Meng Orogenic Belt

We undertook zircon U–Pb dating and geochemical analyses of the Weitingchagan (WT) pluton in the Dong Ujimqi area, Northeast China, with an aim of determining their ages, petrogenesis and sources, which are important for understanding the Late Palaeozoic tectonic evolution of the Xing‐Meng Orogenic Belt. The WT pluton consists of coarse‐ to medium‐grained porphyritic granites in the core and medium‐ to fine‐grained monzogranites in the rim, contains abundant microgranular enclaves and is intruded by small amounts of muscovite monzogranites. The results of LA‐ICP‐MS zircon U–Pb dating indicate that the WT composite pluton formed during the Late Carboniferous–Early Permian with the ages ranging from 289 Ma to 312 Ma. Petrological and geochemical characteristics of the WT pluton were derived from the partial melting of crustal materials, and the AFC process played an important role in the magmatic evolution. The porphyritic granites are I‐type granite, and the monzogranites and muscovite monzogranites are highly fractionated I‐type granite. Combined with previous studies on the contemporaneous magma‐tectonic activities in the Uliastai Continental Margin, the study suggests that the WT pluton formed in an extensional environment, which may relate to the closure of the Palaeo‐Asian Ocean. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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Syn‐convergence exhumation of continental crust: evidence from structural and metamorphic analysis of the Monte Cecu area, Alpine Corsica (Northern Corsica, France)

In the Corsica Island, a stack of metamorphic continental units derived from the European continental margin is thrust over a pre‐Alpine basement during the convergence‐related processes in the Late Eocene–Early Miocene time span. The Piedigriggio‐Prato Unit is representative of these units. Its tectono‐metamorphic history has been reconstructed by an integrated approach, ranging from map‐ to meso‐ and microscopic scale analyses. This unit is characterized by a polyphase deformation history that consists of three deformation phases developed under retrograde metamorphism ranging from blueschist to sub‐greenschist facies metamorphic conditions. At the map‐scale, the Piedigriggio‐Prato Unit is characterized by km‐size isoclinal folds deformed by open to closed recumbent folds producing Type 3 fold interference pattern. The features of the deformations and the P–T conditions suggest that the first two phases were acquired during the ductile extrusion of the Piedigriggio‐Prato Unit. Before the Early Miocene, the gravitational collapse of over‐thickened continental crust produced vertical shortening and the consequently recumbent F3 folds. The exhumation history of the Piedigriggio‐Prato Unit can be viewed as representative for the exhumation of a continental crust fragment during the transition from the continental subduction to the continental collision. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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British jurassic regular echinoids. part 1, introduction, cidaroida, echinothurioida, aspidodiadematoida and perinoida by Andrew B. Smith. Monograph of the Palaeontographical Society, London, 169 (no. 644), 2015. No of pages: 61+xli. Price: UK£160‐00. ISSN 0269-3445 (paperback).

Book Review Authors Jeffrey R. Thompson Corresponding author University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA Search for more papers

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Geochronology, geochemistry and tectonic implications of Weitingchagan composite pluton in northern segment of the Xing-Meng Orogenic Belt

We undertook zircon U–Pb dating and geochemical analyses of the Weitingchagan (WT) pluton in the Dong Ujimqi area, Northeast China, with an aim of determining their ages, petrogenesis and sources, which are important for understanding the Late Palaeozoic tectonic evolution of the Xing-Meng Orogenic Belt. The WT pluton consists of coarse- to medium-grained porphyritic granites in the core and medium- to fine-grained monzogranites in the rim, contains abundant microgranular enclaves and is intruded by small amounts of muscovite monzogranites. The results of LA-ICP-MS zircon U–Pb dating indicate that the WT composite pluton formed during the Late Carboniferous–Early Permian with the ages ranging from 289 Ma to 312 Ma. Petrological and geochemical characteristics of the WT pluton were derived from the partial melting of crustal materials, and the AFC process played an important role in the magmatic evolution. The porphyritic granites are I-type granite, and the monzogranites and muscovite monzogranites are highly fractionated I-type granite. Combined with previous studies on the contemporaneous magma-tectonic activities in the Uliastai Continental Margin, the study suggests that the WT pluton formed in an extensional environment, which may relate to the closure of the Palaeo-Asian Ocean. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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British jurassic regular echinoids. part 1, introduction, cidaroida, echinothurioida, aspidodiadematoida and perinoida by Andrew B. Smith. Monograph of the Palaeontographical Society, London, 169 (no. 644), 2015. No of pages: 61+xli. Price: UK£160‐00. ISSN 0269-3445 (paperback).

Book Review Authors Jeffrey R. Thompson University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA Search for more papers by this

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Astronomers identify a young heavyweight star in the Milky Way

Astronomers have identified a young star, located almost 11,000 light years away, which could help us understand how the most massive stars in the Universe are formed. This young star, already more than 30 times the mass of our Sun, is still in the process of gathering material from its parent molecular cloud, and may be even more massive when it finally reaches adulthood. The results will be presented this week at the Star Formation 2016 conference held at the University of Exeter, UK, and are to be published in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

 

The researchers, led by a team at the University of Cambridge, have identified a key stage in the birth of a very massive star, and found that these stars form in a similar way to much smaller stars like our Sun – from a rotating disc of gas and dust.

In our galaxy, massive young stars – those with a mass at least eight times greater than the Sun – are much more difficult to study than smaller stars. This is because they live fast and die young, making them rare among the 100 billion stars in the Milky Way, and on average, they are much further away.

 

“An average star like our Sun is formed over a few million years, whereas massive stars are formed orders of magnitude faster — around 100,000 years,” said Dr John Ilee from Cambridge’s Institute of Astronomy, the study’s lead author. “These massive stars also burn through their fuel much more quickly, so they have shorter overall lifespans, making them harder to catch when they are infants.”

The protostar that Ilee and his colleagues identified resides in an infrared dark cloud – a very cold and dense region of space which makes for an ideal stellar nursery. However, this rich star-forming region is difficult to observe using conventional telescopes, since the young stars are surrounded by a thick, opaque cloud of gas and dust. But by using the Submillimeter Array (SMA) in Hawaii and the Karl G Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) in New Mexico, both of which use relatively long wavelengths of light to observe the sky, the researchers were able to ‘see’ through the cloud and into the stellar nursery itself.

 

By measuring the amount of radiation emitted by cold dust near the star, and by using unique fingerprints of various different molecules in the gas, the researchers were able to determine the presence of a ‘Keplerian’ disc – one which rotates more quickly at its centre than at its edge.

thumb mm1 artistsArtist’s impression of the disc and outflow around the massive young star. Credit: A. Smith (Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge)

 

“This type of rotation is also seen in the Solar System – the inner planets rotate around the Sun more quickly than the outer planets,” said Ilee. “It’s exciting to find such a disc around a massive young star, because it suggests that massive stars form in a similar way to lower mass stars, like our Sun.”

 

The initial phases of this work were part of an undergraduate summer research project at the University of St Andrews, funded by the Royal Astronomical Society (RAS). The undergraduate carrying out the work, Pooneh Nazari, said, “My project involved an initial exploration of the observations, and writing a piece of software to ‘weigh’ the central star. I’m very grateful to the RAS for providing me with funding for the summer project — I’d encourage anyone interested in academic research to try one!”

 

From these observations, the team measured the mass of the protostar to be over 30 times the mass of the Sun. In addition, the disc surrounding the young star was also calculated to be relatively massive, between two and three times the mass of our Sun. Dr Duncan Forgan, also from St Andrews and lead author of a companion paper, said, “Our theoretical calculations suggest that the disc could in fact be hiding even more mass under layers of gas and dust. The disc may even be so massive that it can break up under its own gravity, forming a series of less massive companion protostars.”

 

The next step for the researchers will be to observe the region with the Atacama Large Millimetre Array (ALMA), located in Chile. This powerful instrument will allow any potential companions to be seen, and shed further light on this intriguing young heavyweight in our galaxy.

 

Media contacts

 

Ms Sarah Collins
Office of Communications, University of Cambridge
Tel: +44 (0)1223 765542
Mob: +44 (0)7525 337458
sarah.collins@admin.cam.ac.uk

 

Dr Morgan Hollis
Royal Astronomical Society
Tel: +44 (0)20 7292 3977
mh@ras.org.uk

 

Dr Sam Lindsay
Royal Astronomical Society
Tel: +44 (0)20 7292 3976
Mob: +44 (0)7957 566 681
sl@ras.org.uk

 


Science contact

 

Dr John Ilee
Institute of Astronomy
University of Cambridge
Tel: +44 (0) 1223 337513
jdilee@ast.cam.ac.uk

 


Images and captions

 

Artist’s impression of the disc and outflow around the massive young star. Credit: A. Smith (Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge)

 


Further information

 

This research will be published in:
J.D. Ilee et al. ‘G11.92-0361 MM1: A Keplerian disc around a massive young proto O-star.’ Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2016): DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stw1912

 

D. H. Forgan et al. ‘Self-gravitating disc candidates around massive young stars.’ Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (2016): DOI: 10.1093/mnras/stw1917

 

Advance Access copies of the papers can be downloaded at:
http://mnras.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2016/08/09/mnras.stw1912.abstract?keytype=ref&ijkey=eluyNqjmL10BXw1

 

http://mnras.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2016/08/09/mnras.stw1917.abstract?keytype=ref&ijkey=zOh0M2tLry5D6rD

 

The team is composed of John D. Ilee (Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, UK), Claudia. J. Cyganowski (University of St Andrews, UK), Pooneh Nazari (University of St Andrews, UK), Todd R. Hunter (National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA), Crystal Brogan (National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, USA), Duncan H. Forgan (University of St Andrews, UK) and Qizhou Zhang (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA).

 

This work has been supported by a grant from the European Research Council.

 


Notes for editors

 

The Royal Astronomical Society (RAS, www.ras.org.uk), founded in 1820, encourages and promotes the study of astronomy, solar-system science, geophysics and closely related branches of science. The RAS organizes scientific meetings, publishes international research and review journals, recognizes outstanding achievements by the award of medals and prizes, maintains an extensive library, supports education through grants and outreach activities and represents UK astronomy nationally and internationally. Its more than 4000 members (Fellows), a third based overseas, include scientific researchers in universities, observatories and laboratories as well as historians of astronomy and others.

Follow the RAS on Twitter via @royalastrosoc

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Studying Earthquakes from England

I’m back at it! This blog has suffered a long hiatus for which I could prattle on with a multitude of excuses, but suffice it to say that the shift from U.S. PhD student life to European postdoc life resulted in a pretty vast rearrangement of my day-to-day activities, priorities, schedule, and habits, and I’ve struggled to carve the time for all the things I’m still even more excited to …

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Perseid meteors could see ‘surge in activity’ on 11 and 12 August

Friday 12 August sees the annual maximum of the Perseid meteor shower. This year, as well as the normal peak on the night of 12/13 August, meteor scientists are predicting additional enhanced activity in the shower the night before, as the Earth passes through a dense clump of cometary debris.

BaskillPerseid idA150b cropped smallA Perseid shooting star near the Pleiades over Woodingdean, Sussex, on the early morning of the 13th August, 2013. Credit: Darren Baskill. Click for a full size image

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Meteors (popularly known as ‘shooting stars’) are the result of small particles, some as small as a grain of sand, entering the Earth’s atmosphere at high speed. The parent comet, Swift-Tuttle, which last passed near the Earth in 1992, leaves this debris in the Earth’s path. On entering the atmosphere, these particles heat the air around them, causing the characteristic streak of light seen from the ground. The meteors appear to originate from a single point, called a ‘radiant’, in the constellation of Perseus, hence the name of the shower.

Russian astronomer Mikhail Maslov and Finnish astronomer Esko Lyytinen predict that this year the Earth will pass through a stream of cometary material shifted towards us by Jupiter’s gravitational field. According to their model, and work by French scientist Jeremie Vaubaillon, we could see a steep rise in activity from late evening on 11 August to 0500 BST on 12 August.

The Perseids are typically active from around 17 July to 24 August, although for most of that period only a few meteors an hour will be visible. During the peak, and if the predictions by Maslov, Lyytinen and Vaubaillon are right, as many as 100 meteors or more may be seen each hour. This year, the light from the waxing gibbous Moon will interfere to some extent for the first part of the night, so observers are advised to look out in the early morning hours after midnight when the Moon is very low in the sky or has set.

meteorsA late-evening meteor above Leith Hill, Surrey, during the Perseid shower of August 2014. Credit: Sam Lindsay (RAS). Click for full-size image

Professor Mark Bailey, Director Emeritus of Armagh Observatory, said “The Perseid meteor shower is one of the best and most reliable meteor showers of the year, and the predictions of a surge in activity this year make it particularly exciting this time. If you’re lucky enough to have a clear sky early in the morning on 12 August, I’d definitely get up to take a look.”

Dr David Asher, also at Armagh Observatory, continued, “If you’re clouded out on the morning of the 12 August, you still have a chance to see the normal maximum the next night.”

Unlike many celestial events, meteor showers are straightforward to watch, and for most people the best equipment to use is simply the naked eye. Advice from experienced meteor observers is to wrap up well and set up a reclining chair to allow you to look up at the sky in comfort. If possible it also helps to be in a dark place away from artificial light, and to have an unobstructed view of the sky.

Although the number of visible meteors is hard to predict accurately, you can expect to see at least one every few minutes. They mostly appear as fleeting streaks of light lasting less than a second, but the brightest ones leave behind trails of vaporised gases and glowing air molecules that may take a few seconds to fade.

 

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How to watch the Perseid Meteor Shower (from 2015), featuring Dr Robert Massey of the RAS. Credit: The Weather Network UK

 


Media contacts

Dr Sam Lindsay (if the weather is clear he will be photographing the shower in dark skies)
Royal Astronomical Society
Tel: +44 (0)20 7292 3976
Mob: +44 (0)7957 566 681
sl@ras.org.uk

 

Dr Morgan Hollis
Tel: +44 (0)20 7292 3977
Royal Astronomical Society
mh@ras.org.uk

 

Dr Robert Massey
Royal Astronomical Society
Tel: +44 (0)20 7292 3979
Mob: +44 (0)7802 877 699
rm@ras.org.uk

 


Science contacts

Prof Mark E. Bailey and Dr David Asher
Armagh Observatory
Northern Ireland
Tel: +44 (0)2837 522 928
meb@arm.ac.uk and dja@arm.ac.uk


http://star.arm.ac.uk/ and http://climate.arm.ac.uk/

 


Images and captions


Further information

 


Notes for editors

The Royal Astronomical Society (RAS), founded in 1820, encourages and promotes the study of astronomy, solar-system science, geophysics and closely related branches of science. The RAS organizes scientific meetings, publishes international research and review journals, recognizes outstanding achievements by the award of medals and prizes, maintains an extensive library, supports education through grants and outreach activities and represents UK astronomy nationally and internationally. Its more than 4000 members (Fellows), a third based overseas, include scientific researchers in universities, observatories and laboratories as well as historians of astronomy and others.

Follow the RAS on Twitter

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Airborne Survey Highlights Rare Earths Exploration Targets In The Phalombe Licence

Calgary, Alberta: August 9, 2016 – Mkango Resources Ltd. (TSXV: MKA; AIM: MKA) (the \’Corporation\’ or \’Mkango\’), is pleased to announce results of the airborne geophysical survey (the \’Survey\’) covering approximately two thirds of its Phalombe licence. The Survey was part of a US$25 million World Bank funded nationwide airborne geophysical programme. The airborne radiometric survey highlights a number of exploration targets within the Phalombe licence. The Songwe Hill rare earths p

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Terrestrial arthropods from the Late Pleistocene of Jamaica – systematics, palaeoecology and taphonomy: supplement

The best preserved specimen of the Late Pleistocene land crab Sesarma sp. cf. S. cookei Hartnoll from the Red Hills Road Cave, Jamaica, was illustrated in an earlier paper, but lost. This note announces its rediscovery and registration in the collections of the Naturalis Biodiversity Center, Leiden. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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Faintest hisses from space reveal famous star’s past life

Astronomers have managed to peer into the past of a nearby star millions of years before its famous explosion, using a telescope in remote outback Australia at a site free from FM radio interference. Research led by a student at the University of Sydney, and including an international team of astronomers observing the region at the lowest-ever radio frequencies, has helped fine-tune our understanding of stellar explosions. The findings are published today in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

SNR1987A still LMC smallArtist’s impression of the supernova flare seen in the Large Magellanic Cloud on 23 February 1987. Credit: CAASTRO / Mats Björklund (Magipics). Click for a full size imageThe research paints a picture of the star’s life long before its death in what was the closest and brightest supernova seen from Earth, now known as supernova remnant 1987A (SN 1987A), which collapsed spectacularly almost 30 years ago.

Much had been known about the immediate past of this star through studying the cosmic ruins resulting from the star’s collapse in 1987, which occurred in a neighbouring galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud. However it was the detection of the very faintest of hisses through low-frequency radio astronomy that has provided the latest insights. Previously, only the final fraction of the dead star’s multi-million-year-long life, about 0.1%, or 20,000 years had been observable.

This latest research – which has enabled astrophysicists to probe the supernova’s past life millions of years further back than was previously possible – was led by Joseph Callingham, a PhD candidate with the University of Sydney and the ARC Centre of Excellence for All-Sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO), under supervision from former Young Australian of the Year and former CAASTRO Director Prof Bryan Gaensler, now at the University of Toronto.

Operating the Murchison Widefield Array in the West Australian desert, the radio astronomers were able to ‘see’ right back to when the star was in its long-lasting red supergiant phase.

Mr Callingham explained previous studies focused on material that was ejected into space when the star was in its final blue supergiant phase. “Just like excavating and studying ancient ruins that teach us about the life of a past civilisation, my colleagues and I have used low-frequency radio observations as a window into the star’s life,” he said.

SNR1987A still RSG smallArtist’s impression of the star in its multi-million year long and previously unobservable phase as a large, red supergiant. Credit: CAASTRO / Mats Björklund (Magipics). Click for a full size imageResearchers found the red supergiant lost its matter at a slower rate and generated slower winds that pushed into its surrounding environment than was previously assumed.

“Our new data improves our knowledge of the composition of space in the region of SN 1987A; we can now go back to our simulations and tweak them, to better reconstruct the physics of supernova explosions,” said Mr Callingham.

Professor Gaensler explained that key to gaining these new insights was the quiet environment in which the radio telescope is located. “Nobody knew what was happening at low radio frequencies, because the signals from our own earthbound FM radio drown out the faint signals from space. Now, by studying the strength of the radio signal, astronomers for the first time can calculate how dense the surrounding gas is, and thus understand the environment of the star before it died.”

 


Media contact

Dr Wiebke Ebeling
ARC Centre of Excellence for All-sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO)
Curtin Institute of Radio Astronomy | Curtin University
Australia
Tel: +61 8 9266 9174
Mob: +61 423 933 444
wiebke.ebeling@curtin.edu.au

 


Science contact

Joseph Callingham
University of Sydney
j.callingham@physics.usyd.edu.au

 


Images and video

 

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The team describe the result, and show an animation of how the older material from the star’s red supergiant phase is being pushed along by younger material and by the shock from the supernova. Credit: CAASTRO

 


Notes for editors

CAASTRO is a collaboration of The University of Sydney, The Australian National University, The University of Melbourne, Swinburne University of Technology, The University of Queensland, The University of Western Australia and Curtin University, the latter two participating together as the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR). CAASTRO is funded under the Australian Research Council (ARC) Centre of Excellence program, with additional funding from the seven participating universities and from the NSW State Government’s Science Leveraging Fund.

The Royal Astronomical Society (RAS), founded in 1820, encourages and promotes the study of astronomy, solar-system science, geophysics and closely related branches of science. The RAS organizes scientific meetings, publishes international research and review journals, recognizes outstanding achievements by the award of medals and prizes, maintains an extensive library, supports education through grants and outreach activities and represents UK astronomy nationally and internationally. Its more than 4000 members (Fellows), a third based overseas, include scientific researchers in universities, observatories and laboratories as well as historians of astronomy and others.

The RAS accepts papers for its journals based on the principle of peer review, in which fellow experts on the editorial boards accept the paper as worth considering. The Society issues press releases based on a similar principle, but the organisations and scientists concerned have overall responsibility for their content.

Follow the RAS on Twitter

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